Matthew Clanahan; ISFJ; 25-year-old graduate student; Learning Support Specialist and adjunct English instructor at Three Rivers College; Bachelor's of Science in Mass Media/Radio with a minor in math from Southeast Missouri State University; Apple enthusiast; total geek; coffee connoisseur; flannel lover, multiple-instrument musician; drummer for Berlin Airlift; caffeine addict; LGBT ally; Christ follower; ordinary radical

Interests: peace, love, equality, people, social justice, human rights, feminism, music, vinyl records, lyrics, quotes, art, poetry, films, books, technology, coffee, tea, demilitarization, sustainability, community, community development, community gardening, historic preservation, Jesus, theology, heterodoxy

Read the Printed Word!

I listen to a lot of music.

I spend a bit too much time swooning over pictures on Tumblr of people I find attractive.

I appreciate meaningful/artistic/literary/lyric tattoos.



 

A church should be like a regular Christian person. It should be humble and welcoming, merciful and compassionate. It should be servant-hearted.

Lee Younger on episode 83 of the Say That podcast

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image(missionusa.com/bridgebox)

(Source: thebridgechicago)

Compassion hurts. When you feel connected to everything, you also feel responsible for everything. And you cannot turn away. Your destiny is bound with the destinies of others. You must either learn to carry the universe or be crushed by it. You must grow strong enough to love the world, yet empty enough to sit down at the same table with its worst horrors.

Andrew Boyd  (via nofatnowhip)

(Source: citythatistocome)

Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive.

Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness (via concocted)

You’d have to be comatose not to feel God’s hurt and anger ooze from the pages of Scripture over the oppression of the weak and vulnerable…I can’t seem to get away from the fact that the main message of God to his people about injustice is to get off our rear ends and do something! This goes way deeper than feeling guilty about doing more; I’m trying to figure out how I got to the place where the things that break the heart of God are so marginal to mine.

Jim Palmer (via haleyinkenya)

God doesn’t share our apathy.

(via contrariansoul)

The problem w/ the Zimmerman verdict isn’t that he got away with murder. It’s that even in 2013, citizens of society refuse to be humble, to be teachable, to be pliable. Pride goes before destruction, and haughtiness before a fall. Society has consistently fallen short of truly being human. Coercion replaces compassion; fear replaces love; complacency replaces being proactive. People have resolved that “this is just the way it is”, shrug their shoulders, and move on with the life, leaving the grieving families of displaced, misplaced, replaced, and dead children in the wake, then they wonder why “kids these days” never learn. Who’s teaching them to be unteachable? Who’s teaching them to be passive and aggressive in the wrong areas of life? Who’s teaching them that murder is okay, sex tapes are the norm and will make you a lot of money, and selling your soul for a reality show is the ultimate goal in life? Who’s teaching them that more time & money are spent on trying to be pretty, in-shape, attractive, and/or appealing to the masses, rather than teaching them humility, generosity, compassion, and love? A part of kindness consists in loving people more than they deserve.

iv (via ernestsewell)

Real love leads beyond the lovers to others. Love expands. Love is inclusive. It enlarges the soul; it enlarges one’s actions, one’s politics, one’s economics, one’s thoughts. Love is not self-serving or exclusive. It expands consciousness and births imagination, it struggles for justice, it stands in solidarity, it dares, it fights, it blossoms into compassion.

Fr. Matthew Fox (via destinationgrace)

(Source: gospelofthekingdom)

In parts of the church there are groups that emphasize holiness and purity as the Christian way of life, and they draw their own sharp social boundaries between the righteous and sinners. It is a sad irony that these groups, many of which are seeking very earnestly to be faithful to Scripture, end up emphasizing those parts of Scripture that Jesus himself challenged and opposed. An interpretation of Scripture faithful to Jesus and the early Christian movement sees the Bible through the lens of compassion, not purity.

Marcus Borg, Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time, p. 59

In short, there is something boundary shattering about the imitatio dei that stood at the center of Jesus’ message and activity: ‘Be compassionate as God is compassionate.’ Whereas purity divides and excludes, compassion unites and includes. For Jesus, compassion had a radical sociopolitical meaning. In his teaching and table fellowship, and in the shape of his movement, the purity system was subverted and an alternative social vision affirmed. The politics of purity was replaced by a politics of compassion.

Marcus Borg, Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time, p. 58

It is striking that ‘Be compassionate as God is compassionate” so closely echoes ‘Be holy as God is holy,’ even as it makes a radical substitution. The close parallel suggests that Jesus deliberately replaced [his religious culture’s] core value of purity with compassion. Compassion, not holiness, is the dominant quality of God, and is therefore to be the ethos of the community that mirrors God.

Marcus Borg, Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time, pp. 53-54

Compassion does not mean only ‘to care about.’ It means ‘to ache from the bowels’—to literally become nauseated with injustice and to get sick to our stomachs with suffering.

Shane Claiborne  (via thesunisfalling)

(Source: papanelly)

If you approach the world with the apron of a servant, then you are allowed to go places that you can’t go if you approach it with the crown of a king.

Jon Foreman (via christypolek)