Matthew Clanahan; ISFJ; 25-year-old graduate student; Learning Support Specialist and adjunct instructor at Three Rivers College; Bachelor's of Science in Mass Media/Radio with a minor in math from Southeast Missouri State University; Apple enthusiast; total geek; coffee connoisseur; flannel lover, multiple-instrument musician; drummer for Berlin Airlift; caffeine addict; LGBT ally; Christ follower; ordinary radical

Interests: peace, love, equality, people, social justice, human rights, feminism, music, vinyl records, lyrics, quotes, art, poetry, films, books, technology, coffee, tea, demilitarization, sustainability, community, community development, community gardening, historic preservation, Jesus, theology, orthodoxy, heterodoxy

Read the Printed Word!

I listen to a lot of music.

I spend a bit too much time swooning over pictures on Tumblr of people I find attractive.

I appreciate meaningful/artistic/literary/lyric tattoos.



 

notallwugs:

Two scientists walk into a bar:

"I’ll have an H2O."

"I’ll have an H2O, too."

The bartender gives them both water because he is able to distinguish the boundary tones that dictate the grammatical function of homonyms in coda position as well as pragmatic context.

standwithpalestine:

(Middle East Eye) GAZA CITY - Without prior warning, an Israeli missile hit the house of the Ayyad family last Saturday. The Ayyads, who are Christian, were the first family among the tiny minority in Gaza to be targeted since the offensive began three weeks ago.

The Ayyad’s home was severely damaged. Furniture was ruined and family belongings such as children’s toys were strewn everywhere as a result of the missile’s impact. But naturally the human cost was much greater.

Jalila Ayyad was known among the people of Gaza as a woman that had nothing to do with any militia groups.  “We are a Christian minority and have no links to Hamas or Fatah - we keep to ourselves and avoid problems,” says Fouad Ayyad, Jalila’s nephew.

Fouad is also the name of the bereaved husband of Jalila Ayyad. Standing in a white T-shirt stained with the blood of his wife and son - who was also seriously injured in the attack - he watches on as the nephew is interviewed.

A memorial service was held on Sunday for Ayyad at Porphyrius Greek Orthodox Church on Sunday. The church has become a haven not just for Christian but also hundreds of Muslim families seeking shelter there as the offensive drags on.

“The church has been our hosts for the past two weeks, offering food, clothes and whatever we needed, their loss is our loss, their pain is our pain,” says 45-year-old Abu Khaled.

At the memorial service for Jalila, Archbishop Alexios said: “Another human being, an innocent one, has lost her life.” In the pews, crowds of Palestinian Christians sobbed as first from their tiny minority to be killed in the conflict was laid to rest.

In something that surprised local journalists, Jalila’s body was carried by both Muslims and Christians to the grave. It seems the shared wounds, mourning and rage are bridging past divides in war-ravaged Gaza.

Last week, Gaza’s Roman Orthodox Church also sustained damage by Israeli artillery shelling. Fifteen graves were damaged and damage was also caused to the Church’s sole hearse, says Kamel Ayyad, a parish member.

“The world must realise that Israel’s missiles don’t differentiate between Christians and Muslims,” said Abu.

At the memorial service a sad young man surrounded by attendees dressed in black gave a speech on behalf of the Greek Orthodox community and questioned the position of the international community in dealing with Israel’s crimes.

“Here is a Palestinian, an Arab, a Christian woman, martyred by Israeli shelling,” he said. “Bombs slammed into us and killed without differentiating between civilians and combatants,” he adds.

Father Manuel Musallam, a former priest of the Latin Church, has always been an advocate for Palestinian unity.

“When they destroy your mosques, call your prayers from our churches”. 

There are approximately 1,500 Christians in Gaza. Mosques stand next to churches along the thin coastal enclave. George Ayyad, a relative of Jalila, rejects the idea that Christians will leave Gaza after this incident.

“This is exactly what the Israelis want, but where should we go?” he questions, before he continues “This is my homeland and we are Christians here in Gaza for more than 1,000 years and we will remain.”

During the memorial, bible scriptures were recited before Ayyad’s body was carried out and placed in a simple white coffin that had been decorated with a black cross.

Homeless Christians and Muslims brought out her remains together in the same community where Jalila will be buried, in the town she was born: in Gaza.

A Virgin Mary icon was placed in Jalila’s coffin while her relatives sang “Hallelujah.”

a-little-melancholy:

chaz-gelf:

sixmilliondeadinternets:

Gandhi has been historically the most aggressive character in Civilization due to an original bug in the first game that caused him to go all-out once he reaches democracy. They just kept the thing going ever since.


To further explain this bug, because I was chatting with mothmonarch about Civilization and other strategy games last night and I never got around to explaining this fully, but I love this story:
Gandhi’s AI in the original game had its aggression set to the absolute minimum (0 on a scale of 0 to 10, I believe, I may have this wrong but the basic idea I’m about to explain is accurate, as far as I can tell). Adopting democracy lowers an AI civ’s aggression by 2 points, so when someone who is fully peaceful loses two points of aggression, they should still be nice and polite, right?
Except this is an old DOS game, and so computer math is in place. What actually happened was that Gandhi’s aggression level ticked backwards two steps, from 0 to 255. On a scale of 0 to 10, Gandhi is now 255 points of pure nuclear rage.
And that’s the story as I recall it, but again I may have gotten some details wrong, so feel free to correct me! After that, as the original poster said, the devs loved the bug so much that they just kept it in as a running joke!

“On a scale of 0 to 10, Gandhi is now 255 points of pure nuclear rage.”I about pissed myself laughing at this.

a-little-melancholy:

chaz-gelf:

sixmilliondeadinternets:

Gandhi has been historically the most aggressive character in Civilization due to an original bug in the first game that caused him to go all-out once he reaches democracy. They just kept the thing going ever since.

To further explain this bug, because I was chatting with mothmonarch about Civilization and other strategy games last night and I never got around to explaining this fully, but I love this story:

Gandhi’s AI in the original game had its aggression set to the absolute minimum (0 on a scale of 0 to 10, I believe, I may have this wrong but the basic idea I’m about to explain is accurate, as far as I can tell). Adopting democracy lowers an AI civ’s aggression by 2 points, so when someone who is fully peaceful loses two points of aggression, they should still be nice and polite, right?

Except this is an old DOS game, and so computer math is in place. What actually happened was that Gandhi’s aggression level ticked backwards two steps, from 0 to 255On a scale of 0 to 10, Gandhi is now 255 points of pure nuclear rage.

And that’s the story as I recall it, but again I may have gotten some details wrong, so feel free to correct me! After that, as the original poster said, the devs loved the bug so much that they just kept it in as a running joke!

On a scale of 0 to 10, Gandhi is now 255 points of pure nuclear rage.”

I about pissed myself laughing at this.

(Source: halcy)

The state is not and should not be the church, and therefore it cannot apply New Testament ethics in an unqualified way. Yet to have made this point does not mean that the state may operate according to standards that contradict those of the gospel … To dispose of the life of fellow humans—who share with us the image of God and for whom Christ, being made in the likeness of men, died—oversteps the limits of the case that any government within ‘Christendom’ can make for ethical compromise. The state is not made Christian by the presence of the church in its population or by the presence of pious phrases on its postage stamps and coins. It has at least been made aware of and has partially committed itself to certain divine standards that it cannot ignore. If a given society permits slavery … and vengeance against criminals (most of the biblical arguments for capital punishment can be closely paralleled by similar ones for the institution of slavery), the church cannot legally abolish those practices; but she can call the state to a closer approximation to true standards of human community.

John Howard Yoder, “Capital Punishment and the Bible,” The End of Sacrifice: The Capital Punishment Writings of John Howard Yoder, p. 36

As we seek the light of God’s Word, the first issue we must face is one of hermeneutics: how are we to understand the relationship between the Old and New Testaments? Does Christ simply complete the Old Testament so that a proper Christian understanding of any problem begins with Moses? Or does he tell us how to read the Old Testament so that a proper approach to the Bible begins with Christ himself? In spite of theoretical affirmations of the centrality of Christ and the finality of the New Covenant, the history of Protestant and Catholic thought on the question of civil order has been overwhelmingly dominated by approaches that consider the Old Testament, not the New Testament, to be fundamental. In effect, this does not mean even that the two Testaments are placed on the same level; for the Old speaks directly to the issue of civil order, and the New speaks to it only obliquely, with the result that in application the Old is placed above the New. This is the real hermeneutic significance of the position of most of those who try to justify the death penalty by ‘what Scripture actually teaches.’

The first shortcoming of this approach is that none of those who advocate it are interested in following it consistently. It is cited where it favors the argument and dropped where inconvenient. To apply consistently this approach to Old Testament prescriptions concerning the social order would mean that the death penalty should also apply to animals (Gen 9:5, Exod 21:28), to witches, and to adulterers. When it is exacted for manslaughter, the executioners should be the victim’s next of kin and there need be no due process of law, but there should be cities of refuge for the innocent and those guilty of unintentional killing (Num 35:11). And while trying in this way to ‘take the Bible seriously,’ the disputant can offer no logical reason for respecting less its prescriptions on the sabbath, the cure for leprosy, slavery, and the economic order.

… All of this so shifts the context of social-ethical thought that a simple transposition of Old Testament prescriptions would be illegitimate even if it were possible.

John Howard Yoder, ”Capital Punishment and the Bible,” The End of Sacrifice: The Capital Punishment Writings of John Howard Yoder

A poet seeks personal and social transformation through poetry; the poet’s art is both a gift to the writer and from the writer who understands that no great gift can be truly given or received in an emotional or intellectual void.

Sam Hamill, The Art of Writing: Lu Chi’s Wen Fu

Youngest Son: All Souls' Day EP

Attention, music lovers:

My friend Steve Slagg just released his new Youngest Son EP, titled All Souls’ Day. I’ve had the privilege of listening to it for a month or so now, and I absolutely love the music Steve is making. For those who don’t know:

Youngest Son is the songwriting project of Steve Slagg, who grew up playing Chopin and hymns on the piano and listening to his sister’s chick-rock mixtapes on a tiny portable boombox with rainbow colored buttons. Son of a Methodist minister and an elementary school teacher, Steve spent his adolescence cruising his rural Missouri hometown and blasting Rufus Wainwright’s Want One from his car stereo. Youngest Son’s music is all about contradiction.

According to Steve, “All Souls’ Day is a fully cooperative sister EP to All Saints’ Day (by far one of my favorite albums of 2012—if you haven’t heard it yet, you might want to consider listening to it first). On All Souls’ Day,Steve is joined by his friends Allison Van Liere, Blade Barringer, and Lee Ketch (Mooner), who help provide covers of a couple songs from All Saints’ Day in addition to an instrumental track, a hymn, and a solo version of the very first song Steve ever wrote.

All in all, this EP, and its sister album, form one of the most impressive projects I’ve ever experienced—and experience is the right word.  Youngest Son don’t just make music; they make art. From the beautiful illustrations designed by Van Liere to the full-text lyrics accompanied by the background descriptions of each song, the web design alone is a testament to the artistry of everyone involved. Combined with Steve’s innovative arrangements and instrumentation, Youngest Son creates art that you don’t want to miss.

Best of all, Steve has once again opted to make the EP available for free. If you’re in a rush, simply click on the above link and download the tracks; however, I highly recommend you stick around and dig into the illustrations, lyrics, and track descriptions available only online. And, once again, ICYMI, don’t forget the incredible album, All Saints’ Day, which All Souls’ Day complements in every way.

Oh, and if you like it? Don’t just tell me and your friends (although, I think you should do that, too)… Let Steve know by sending him a tip through NoiseTrade.

babeimgonnaleaveu:


Woodstock, 1969.

"They went to a psychedelic pasture to listen to their music, to be with people who dressed like them and played like them. There was a shared bond on a cosmic scale, and their elders marveled that all these kids could be in one place for three days without violence or mayhem, despite pitifully inadequate facilities and food supplies, and despite rains that fell so long and hard they would have drowned any other party. The lesson was simple: These long-haired, antiwar bra-burners and boys with beads had created a field of dreams, and perhaps from it would rise something bright and beautiful for the future."

babeimgonnaleaveu:

Woodstock, 1969.

"They went to a psychedelic pasture to listen to their music, to be with people who dressed like them and played like them. There was a shared bond on a cosmic scale, and their elders marveled that all these kids could be in one place for three days without violence or mayhem, despite pitifully inadequate facilities and food supplies, and despite rains that fell so long and hard they would have drowned any other party. The lesson was simple: These long-haired, antiwar bra-burners and boys with beads had created a field of dreams, and perhaps from it would rise something bright and beautiful for the future."

Religion is like a knife: you can either use it to cut bread, or stick it in someone’s back.

starry-eyed-wolfchild:

A town known as the “town of books”, Hay-on-Wye is located on the Welsh / English border in the United Kingdom and is a bibliophile’s sanctuary.

(Source: whenonearth.net)

Played 2,611 times

This is my final act, so I’ll need your full attention
And for my final trick I’ll make everyone who loves me disappear
But I won’t know how to bring them back

(Source: sometimesnina)

I got to meet sydthekiddd today! :D Looking forward to a fun weekend of thrift shops, book stores, flea markets, music, games, laughter, and talking. Thanks for coming to visit, Sydney!